Debbie Cenziper

Debbie Cenziper is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist with The Washington Post. Over the past 20 years, she has investigated government fraud, public housing scandals, white-collar crime, and deaths in psychiatric hospitals. Her stories have prompted Congressional investigations, criminal convictions, new laws, and the delivery of hundreds of millions of dollars in funding for the poor. Cenziper has won many major awards in American print journalism, including the Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting from Harvard University and the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Journalism, given by Ethel Kennedy and the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice & Human Rights.

Sessions

Books

Love Wins: The Lovers and Lawyers Who Fought the Landmark Case for Marriage Equality

In Love Wins: The Lovers and Lawyers Who Fought the Landmark Case for Marriage Equality (William Morrow; June 14, 2016), Pulitzer Prize-winning The Washington Post reporter Debbie Cenziper and co-author Jim Obergefell, the named plaintiff and now among the most recognized faces in the LGBTQ rights movement, present an intimate, gripping account of the legal precedents and personal hardships behind this unforgettable victory for the gay community. Taking readers inside courtrooms, lives, and hearts, Love Wins captures the determination and courage of couples, families, supporters, activists, and attorneys who joined forces to validate the bonds between same-sex partners from coast to coast.


As Love Wins recounts, the fight for the right to marry was fueled by tragedy: the impending death of Jim Obergefell’s longtime partner and husband, John Arthur. Though John was dying from ALS, the couple in 2013 flew from their home in Cincinnati to Maryland, where same-sex marriage was legal, and exchanged vows on an airport tarmac. In his final days, John expressed his longing to die with dignity, rightfully remembered as a married man. But their home state of Ohio would not recognize the marriage, which meant that John would be listed as “unmarried” on his death certificate, with no surviving spouse. Three months before John died, the couple found an ally in Al Gerhardstein, a straight, middle-aged husband, father, and scrappy civil rights lawyer with a record as an unwavering defender of the gay community.


Throughout,Love Wins illustrates Al Gerhardstein’s conviction: Every civil rights case starts with a story. Keeping the tension mounting until the stunning Supreme Court ruling, this riveting narrative will resonate not only with same-sex couples, but every reader who believes in the power of love, the sanctity of marriage, and the constitutional right to fair and equal treatment for all Americans.