Blood at the Root

Marriott Conference Center B presented by Atlanta Pro AV

Sunday, 2:30-3:15

Award-winning poet and Atlanta-area native Patrick Phillips presents a gripping tale of racial cleansing in Forsyth County, Georgia, and a harrowing testament to the deep roots of racial violence in America. Phillips breaks the century-long silence of his hometown and uncovers a history of racial terrorism that continues to shape America in the twenty-first century. Lauded poet Natasha Trethewey will lead the discussion about the book with Phillips and Pulitlizer Prize-winning journalist Hank Klibanoff.

Trethewey served two terms as the 19th Poet Laureate of the United States (2012-2014). She is the author of four collections of poetry, Domestic Work (2000), Bellocq’s Ophelia (2002), Native Guard (2006)—for which she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize—and, most recently, Thrall, (2012). Her book of non-fiction, Beyond Katrina: A Meditation on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, appeared in 2010. She is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Guggenheim Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Beinecke Library at Yale, and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard. At Emory University she is Robert W. Woodruff Professor of English and Creative Writing.

Klibanoff, who won a Pulitzer Prize for a book about the news coverage of the civil rights struggle in the South, is the James M. Cox Jr. Professor of Journalism at Emory University. He also serves as director of the Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases Project at Emory University (coldcases.emory.edu), for which undergraduates are examining Georgia history through the prism of unsolved or unpunished racially motivated murders that occurred in the state during the modern civil rights era.

Presenters

Hank Klibanoff

Hank Klibanoff, who won a Pulitzer Prize for a book about the news coverage of the civil rights struggle in the South, is the James M. Cox Jr. Professor of Journalism at Emory University. He also serves as director of the Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases Project at Emory University (coldcases.emory.edu), for which undergraduates are examining Georgia history through the prism of unsolved or unpunished racially motivated murders that occurred in the state during the modern civil rights era. A native of Alabama, Klibanoff joined Emory at the close of a 36-year career in newspapers in Mississippi and at The Boston Globe, The Philadelphia Inquirer and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, where he had served as managing editor for news. Klibanoff and his co-author, Gene Roberts, won the 2007 Pulitzer Prize in history for their book, The Race Beat: The Press, the Civil Rights Struggle,and the Awakening of a Nation.

Patrick Phillips

Patrick Phillips is an award-winning poet, translator, and professor. A Guggenheim and National Endowment for the Arts Fellow, his most recent book, Elegy for a Broken Machine, was a finalist for the National Book Award in poetry. Phillips lives in Brooklyn, NY and teaches at Drew University.
Natasha Trethewey

Natasha Trethewey served two terms as the 19th Poet Laureate of the United States (2012-2014). She is the author of four collections of poetry, Domestic Work (2000), Bellocq’s Ophelia (2002), Native Guard (2006)—for which she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize—and, most recently, Thrall, (2012). Her book of non-fiction, Beyond Katrina: A Meditation on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, appeared in 2010. She is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Guggenheim Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Beinecke Library at Yale, and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard. At Emory University she is Robert W. Woodruff Professor of English and Creative Writing.

Interviewer

Natasha Trethewey