Gary  Hauk-Emory as a Place: Meaning in a University Landscape

Gary Hauk

Bio

Gary S. Hauk is the university historian of Emory University, where he served in senior administrative positions for thirty years. He is also senior editorial consultant at Emory’s Center for the Study of Law and Religion and a longtime board member and officer of Georgia Humanities. He is the author of A Legacy of Heart and Mind: Emory since 1836 and Religion and Reason Joined: Candler at One Hundred.

Sessions

Emory as Place: Meaning in a University Landscape

The history of a university resides not just in its archives but also in the place itself—the walkways and bridges, the libraries and classrooms, the gardens and creeks winding their way across campus. To think of Emory as place, as Hauk invites you to do, is not only to consider its geography and its architecture (the lay of the land and the built-up spaces its people inhabit) but also to imagine how the external, constructed world can cultivate an internal world of wonder and purpose and responsibility—in short, how a landscape creates meaning. Emory as Place offers physical, though mute, evidence of how landscape and population have shaped each other over decades of debate about architecture, curriculum, and resources. More than that, the physical development of the place mirrors the university’s awareness of itself as an arena of tension between the past and the future—even between the past and the present, between what the university has been and what it now purports or intends to be, through its spaces. Most of all, thinking of Emory as place suggests a way to get at the core meaning of an institution as large, diverse, complex, and tentacled as a modern research university.

Introducer: Laura McCarty

Laura McCarty is president of Georgia Humanities. She joined Georgia Humanities as program assistant, and she has subsequently led the grant program, National History Day Georgia, the New Georgia Encyclopedia, and Museum on Main Street tours. She is author of Coretta Scott King: a Biography, as well as over 30 articles for the New Georgia Encyclopedia. A native of South Carolina, Laura holds the MA in Comparative Literature from the University of Georgia and the BA in English and French from Wofford College. She lives in Decatur with her husband, Phillip.

  • Marriott Conference Center C
  • Sat 5:30-6:15p Marriott C

Emory as a Place: Meaning in a University Landscape

To think of Emory as place, as Hauk invites you to do, is not only to consider its geography and its architecture (the lay of the land and the built-up spaces its people inhabit) but also to imagine how the external, constructed world can cultivate an internal world of wonder and purpose and responsibility—in short, how a landscape creates meaning. Emory as Place offers physical, though mute, evidence of how landscape and population have shaped each other over decades of debate about architecture, curriculum, and resources. More than that, the physical development of the place mirrors the university’s awareness of itself as an arena of tension between the past and the future—even between the past and the present, between what the university has been and what it now purports or intends to be, through its spaces. Most of all, thinking of Emory as place suggests a way to get at the core meaning of an institution as large, diverse, complex, and tentacled as a modern research university.

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