Rachel Louise Snyder-No Visible Bruises

Rachel Louise Snyder

Bio

Rachel Louise Snyder is the author of Fugitive Denim: A Moving Story of People and Pants in the Borderless World of Global Trade, the novel What We’ve Lost is Nothing, and, No Visible Bruises: What We Don’t Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us. Over the last decade, Snyder has been an outspoken journalist on issues of domestic violence and her work has appeared in the New Yorker, The New York Times magazine, Slate, Salon, The Washington Post, Huffington Post, The Chicago Tribune, The New Republic, and others. No Visible Bruises was awarded the prestigious 2018 Lukas Work-in-Progress Award from the Columbia School of Journalism and Harvard’s Nieman Foundation. Over the past two decades, Snyder has traveled to more than fifty countries, covering issues of human rights. She lived, for six years, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia before relocating to Washington, DC in 2009. Originally from Chicago, Snyder holds a B.A. from North Central College and an M.F.A. from Emerson College. She is currently an Associate Professor of Creative Writing and Journalism at American University in Washington, DC.

Sessions

No Visible Bruises: What We Don't Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us

We call it domestic violence. We call it private violence. Sometimes we call it intimate terrorism. But whatever we call it, we generally do not believe it has anything at all to do with us, despite the World Health Organization deeming it a “global epidemic.” In America, intimate partner violence accounts for 15 percent of all violent crime, and yet it remains an object of silence, spoken of in hushed tones, even as its tendrils reach unseen into every national issue from our economy to our education system, from mass shootings to mass incarceration to #MeToo. We still have not taken the true measure of this problem. In No Visible Bruises, journalist Rachel Louise Snyder gives an urgent and immersive account of the scope of domestic violence in our country, structured around key case studies that explode the common myths—that if things were bad enough, victims would just leave; that a violent person cannot become nonviolent; that shelter is an adequate response; that violence inside the home is separate from other forms of violence like mass shootings, gang violence, and sexual assault. Through the stories of victims, perpetrators, law enforcement, and reform movements from across the country, Snyder explores not only the real roots of domestic violence, but also its far-reaching consequences for society, and what it will take to truly address it.

Interviewer: Dona Yarborough

Dona Yarbrough is the assistant vice president of Campus Life at Emory University, with responsibility for faculty engagement; graduate and professional student initiatives; the Barkley Forum for Debate, Deliberation, and Dialogue; and Emory’s student-focused belonging and community justice centers. Throughout her career in higher education, she has been involved in sexual misconduct and intimate partner violence education and policy. She earned her PhD in English from the University of Virginia, and she is a recipient of the Modern Language Association’s Crompton-Noll Award for best essay in lesbian, gay, queer studies.

  • Marriott Conference Center A
  • Sat 5:30-6:15p Marriott A

No Visible Bruises

We call it domestic violence. We call it private violence. Sometimes we call it intimate terrorism. But whatever we call it, we generally do not believe it has anything at all to do with us, despite the World Health Organization deeming it a “global epidemic.” In America, domestic violence accounts for 15 percent of all violent crime, and yet it remains locked in silence, even as its tendrils reach unseen into so many of our most pressing national issues, from our economy to our education system, from mass shootings to mass incarceration to #MeToo. We still have not taken the true measure of this problem. In No Visible Bruises, journalist Rachel Louise Snyder gives context for what we don’t know we’re seeing. She frames this urgent and immersive account of the scale of domestic violence in our country around key stories that explode the common myths-that if things were bad enough, victims would just leave; that a violent person cannot become nonviolent; that shelter is an adequate response; and most insidiously that violence inside the home is a private matter, sealed from the public sphere and disconnected from other forms of violence. Through the stories of victims, perpetrators, law enforcement, and reform movements from across the country, Snyder explores the real roots of private violence, its far-reaching consequences for society, and what it will take to truly address it.

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