Richard Blanco-How to Love a Country

Richard Blanco

Bio

Richard Blanco served President Obama as the fifth inaugural poet in U.S. history, the youngest and the first Latino, immigrant, and gay person to serve in such a role. The negotiation of cultural identity characterizes his three collections of poetry: City of a Hundred Fires, which received the Agnes Starrett Poetry Prize from the University of Pittsburgh Press; Directions to The Beach of the Dead, recipient of the Beyond Margins Award from the PEN American Center; and Looking for The Gulf Motel, recipient of the Paterson Poetry Prize and the Thom Gunn Award. He has also authored the memoirs For All of Us, One Today: An Inaugural Poet’s Journey and The Prince of Los Cocuyos: A Miami Childhood, winner of a Lambda Literary Award. He is a Woodrow Wilson Fellow and has taught at Georgetown University, American University, and Wesleyan University.

Hear Richard Blanco in multiple sessions at DBF 2019:
Friday, Aug 30 at 8PM
Keynote – Effecting Change in a Changing World: Latinx Writers on Immigration
Saturday, Aug 31 at 12:30PM
Poetry Reading: Richard Blanco and Natalie Scenters-Zapico, PEN American Immigration Track


Sessions

Poetry Reading: Richard Blanco and Natalie Scenters-Zapico, PEN American Immigration Track

Richard Blanco’s How to Love a Country is a new collection from the renowned inaugural poet exploring immigration, gun violence, racism, LGBTQ issues, and more, in accessible and emotive verses. In her striking second collection, Lima::Limon, Natalie Scenters-Zapico sets her unflinching gaze once again on the borders of things. Join these two poets as they read from their new works.

Introducer: Karen Stolley

Professor Karen Stolley, who came to Emory in 1992, received her Ph.D. in Spanish from Yale University and her B.A. in Spanish and French, summa cum laude, from Middlebury College. She spent a year as a Rotary Fellow in Tucumán, Argentina and received a Fulbright Fellowship to study at the Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia. Prior to coming to Emory, Professor Stolley taught at Vassar College; she has also taught at the Middlebury Summer Spanish Language School and as visiting faculty at the University of Pennsylvania. At Emory Professor Stolley teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in colonial and eighteenth-century Spanish American and transatlantic literary and cultural studies; she is also a member of the graduate faculty in History.

  • Decatur Presbyterian Sanctuary presented by Emory University
  • Sat 12:30-1:15p Presbyterian

How to Love a Country

A new collection from the renowned inaugural poet exploring immigration, gun violence, racism, LGBTQ issues, and more, in accessible and emotive verses. The diverse poems in this collection form a mosaic of seemingly varied topics: the Pulse Nightclub massacre; an unexpected encounter on a visit to Cuba; the forced exile of 8,500 Navajos in 1868; the arrival of a young Chinese woman at Angel Island in 1938; the incarceration of a gifted writer; and the poet’s abiding love for his partner, who he is finally allowed to wed. But despite each poem’s unique subject matter or occasion, all are fundamentally asking one overwhelming question: how to love this country?

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