Virginia Eubanks-Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile

Virginia Eubanks

Bio

Virginia Eubanks is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University at Albany, SUNY. She is the author of Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police, and Punish the Poor; Digital Dead End: Fighting for Social Justice in the Information Age; and co-editor, with Alethia Jones, of Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around: Forty Years of Movement Building with Barbara Smith. Her writing about technology and social justice has appeared in Scientific American, The Nation, Harper’s, and Wired. For two decades, Eubanks has worked in community technology and economic justice movements. She was a founding member of the Our Data Bodies Project and a 2016-2017 Fellow at New America. She lives in Troy, NY.

Sessions

Lillian Smith Awards

Authors Virginia Eubanks (Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police, and Punish the Poor), Rachel Devlin (A Girl Stands at the Door: The Generation of Young Women Who Desegregated America's Schools), and Vanessa Siddle Walker (The Lost Education of Horace Tate: Uncovering the Hidden Heroes Who Fought for Justice in Schools) will be honored as recipients of the 2018 Lillian Smith Book Awards. The University of Georgia Libraries sponsors the awards, in partnership with the Southern Regional Council, the Georgia Center for the Book, and Piedmont College, to honor the social justice activist and highly-acclaimed author of Strange Fruit and Killers of the Dream.

Moderator: Charles Johnson
  • Decatur Library presented by WABE
  • Sun 2:30-3:15p Library

Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police, and Punish the Poor

In Automating Inequality, Virginia Eubanks systematically investigates the impacts of data mining, policy algorithms, and predictive risk models on poor and working-class people in America. The book is full of heart-wrenching and eye-opening stories, from a woman in Indiana whose benefits are literally cut off as she lays dying to a family in Pennsylvania in daily fear of losing their daughter because they fit a certain statistical profile. The U.S. has always used its most cutting-edge science and technology to contain, investigate, discipline and punish the destitute. Like the county poorhouse and scientific charity before them, digital tracking and automated decision-making hide poverty from the middle-class public and give the nation the ethical distance it needs to make inhumane choices: which families get food and which starve, who has housing and who remains homeless, and which families are broken up by the state. In the process, they weaken democracy and betray our most cherished national values.

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